New Healthcare Reform in the US

Flashing Back to 2010, the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, became the law of the land. Anyone caught without health insurance, were then able to enroll starting in November 2014 and ending in February 2015.

What updates will we see in the new American Health Care Act?

Parts of ACA that are remaining in place:

  • Pre-existing conditions. All insurers must offer health insurance to all people, even those who are currently sick.
  • Children remain on insurance. Until the age of 26, kids can stay on their parents’ plan.
  • The ban on yearly and lifetime limits.
  • Medicaid expansion. The Affordable Care Act allowed many more people onto the Medicaid rolls. For now, that arrangement will stay in place. In 2020, however, an enrollment freeze will go into effect.

Parts of ACA that are going away:

  • Individual mandate. Republicans have long argued that no government has the right to mandate anything for its people, especially not health insurance. Under ACA, every citizen was required by law to have health insurance or to pay a fine to the government.

Even with the healthcare reforms, government surcharges will still exist.

  • Paying for benefits that don’t apply to you. It has been argued that men should not pay for maternity services, and that non-smokers should pay less than heavy smokers. Under the healthcare reforms, insurers will have the option to offer cheaper plans with narrower coverage than before.

Both plans offer tax credits. While ACA was based on income, with the expressed aim of providing care for more poor people, AHCA will arguably give more help to people the older they get, although insurers will be able to charge their older customers as much as five times as much as their younger customers.

While the ACHA looks to introduce many changes, many of which have been criticized, the Act is still being formulated. We’ll be watching closely to see how the eventual Act will affect US citizens.

For more information and reading on the current Health Care reforms visit: https://www.nytimes.com/topic/subject/health-care-reform